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Innovation and society

7.5 credits

The course is offered by the Faculty of Social Sciences as an interdisciplinary single–subject course at the PhD candidate level. The language of instruction is English.

About the course

This course is now closed for application. 

This course identifies and goes beyond the rhetoric of innovation as entrepreneurship and the solving of technical problems, to investigate what innovation is beyond the firm and how innovation impacts society – and vice versa. The course provides a critical introduction to innovation as a process and as a strategy used by private as well as public sector organizations to achieve their goals. The course emphasizes the intended and unintended impacts of innovation on societies, by analyzing the social and geographical distribution of innovation’s consequences, potential conflicts between goals, and the challenges and opportunities for governance. The course uses a multi-level approach to innovation, linking macro level processes, institutions and technological advancement to local practices, outcomes and experiences at actor-level. The course invites doctoral students to engage with their own field of research within the course’s framework, regardless of their disciplinary background.

Course information

Course coordinators
Josephine Rekers

Course administrator
Frank Schreier

Documents
The documents below open in a new tab.

Course overview and schedule (PDF)

Reading list (PDF)
Course syllabus (PDF)

Links
Map to lecture halls